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The Velvet Buzzsaw Dan Gilroy | Review

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Published on Feb 02, 2019

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With the Velvet Buzzsaw screenwriter and director Dan Gilroy is back to work with Jake Ghyllenhaal in an attempt to remind the critics that he was not only the author of the poor and the condemned End of Justice – No one Is Innocent, but also, and indeed especially one of The Nightcrawler, a brilliant, daring and crudelissima work before: that the same parable of careerism, the dark mirror, the ruthless and distorted the american way, in this small jewel in the rough films – produced entirely by Netflix, obviously able to offer that support non-drama, legal with Denzel Washington – is mixed into the vein in the horror of the curse, but also to the noir genre and a satirical comedy, in a mixture of ideas, inspiration and suggestions that could cause the failure, but who, instead, becomes the driving force.

At least in the first hour, when Gilroy with extreme wisdom film accumulates information, characters, situations and premises, promoting the creation of a specific world that, while it illustrates its dynamics, speaks to us of another (impossible not to notice the chagrin with which the director responds to critics who have panned his previous work). Unfortunately, however, in the second part, that is, when the voltage accumulated in the first time must be released without any brakes, here come those same problems that had already plagued the End of Justice, with a mounting hasty that turns every scene into a hell of its own, impromptu, and almost detached from the rest of the performance, with characters that change drastically their way of thinking and acting from one minute to another, from one set to another, from one situation to another.

In the ruthless world of contemporary art, the agent emerging Josephina find hundreds of paintings that belonged to an elderly tenant of his palace, and died in total solitude. Ignoring the instructions left by the elder artist, he would have wanted his works destroyed, Josephina starts to circulate the paintings in the most important art galleries of the city, giving rise immediately to the attention of critics and collectors. But behind these works lies something sinister that endangers any person they come in contact.

Unlike the two previous works this Velvet Buzzsaw is a choral film, where the real protagonist is this art undergrowth made up of artists and critics where the first depends by the second, and vice versa: it is clear, as Gilroy odi deeply into his characters, as I have created them only to see them suffer and ridiculed, ruined by his own choices and his own visions of life. But it is as if the director and the screenwriter – which here coincide – they have quarreled and are going against one another at the time of bringing to the screen the words on the sheets of the script, and, especially in the second act, a few pages of a script (or some scene shot) is lost in the chaos that is created by this struggle.

There are two films, inside this Velvet Buzzsaw, and it is evident when one ends and the other begins: this is a real shame, because the descent in the confines of the horror genre in this way, it is too sudden, like a death by hanging. A for suffocation would have been more engaging, and would have exalted the lot of material from the cult that Gilroy had put together.

The Velvet Buzzsaw Dan Gilroy | Review of MangaForever.net

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