Advertisement

The Guardian of the Dam Volume 1 | Review

Advertisement

Published on Sep 10, 2018

Advertisement

The urge to move his readers, pushing BAO Publishing to try touching stories around the world and, this time, Italian fans can benefit from the talent of the two masters Robert Kondo and Daisuke Dice Tsutsumi (the founders of the animation studio Tonko House, as well as collaborators with the Pixar masterpieces like Toy Story 3, Ratatouille and Monsters University) which have decided to adapt their award-winning short film “The Dam Keeper (nominated for the Oscar in the best animated short) in a comic book divided in three volumes, in fact The Guardian of the Dam.

The protagonist of the story is a young piglet, an orphan because of the death of the mother and father then. The latter, before leaving, he instructed that a day could handle the Dam, the last protection of the Valley of the dawn) from “the Fog“, a fluffy wave of dark cloud is the bearer of the worst misfortunes. Between the life of a normal child (with a lot of teasing on the part of the companions) and the “adult” maintainer of a baluastro, the protagonist carries out his life haunted by the Fog, by its mechanisms and by the figure of the father, mad at his eyes because of the Dam and of the great threat of the dark cloud. Looking for himself, his place in the world and the answer to the mysteries since childhood, her life, the little piggy's face, with her friend the Fox and the hated Hippo, the attack of the Fog in the Dam. So begins an adventure that leads the small group to the exploration of a new world..., the meeting with the mysterious mr. Van, does not increase the aura of mystery that surrounds the shipping.

This is enough volume to make us understand the type of story that Kondo and Tsutsumi want to introduce ourselves: intense, moving, allussiva and with a deep moral. The story of the little piggy and his suffering are, in a symbolic way, as opposed to the wave dark brought on by the Fog, despite the beginning of a heartbreaking and noir, with the tone of anguish, and the slow progress of the action (increased from the incredible drawing style that, throughout history, seems to want to highlight the pixels of each table, to fully explore the environment and characters, and reproduce the visual sensation of the cinema of animation), and the rest of the story has a flavor of a fairy tale, tables are often mute, and many monologues to make a side dish to a narration with little dialogue, delicate and touching. Small negative note the cracking in the volumes of a story so immersive that does weigh the player, and not a little, the interruption of the events.

The first volume of The Guardian of the Dam is only the prelude to some of the events that, once fully carried out, will fill gently the hearts of the readers, in the wake of Three Shadows by Cyril Pedrosa.

The Guardian of the Dam Volume 1 | Review of MangaForever.net

Advertisement

Advertisement

image

Hey friend

Your blog talks about The Guardian Of The Dam Volume 1 | Review? Contact Us to be indexed in the BitFeed Network