Advertisement

The Greatest Showman Michael Gracey | Review

Advertisement

Published on Dec 29, 2017

Advertisement

There is absolutely nothing great in the spectacle offered by The Greatest Showman, the film's rather modest put together by Michael Gracey and Bill Condon (much better in the role of director in the albeit modest remake live-action beauty and The Beast, that here in the script), which had different objectives – first of all make money in the wake of the success of The Land, propose to the public some nice single to listen to in profusion on Spotify and enhance the many talents of Hugh Jackman with the hope of throwing him towards the next and upcoming Oscar – but that has pretty much failed on the whole line – with almost a hundred million budget has collected a little more than 30, the musical themes will be forgotten as soon as out from the cinema and Jackman, beyond a nomination at the Golden Globes, to say the least donated, the Oscars will probably see them from the house – leading to one of the most burning disappointments 2017, just in time for the end of the year.

A film in production since 2009 for the rest it was fair to expect much, much more, and at the end there are very few things that are worth saving: with a script that others would describe as embarrassing (to quote a joke from a ridiculous critic with the glasses and beard, played by Paul Sparks), but we just label it as hasty, a CGI heaviest of the moustache-the moustache of Henry Cavill in the Justice League (who can also pass, if used in profusion for the backgrounds of the environments, but that becomes really unbearable, almost nauseating, in the fall musical), a metaphor cloying by the glycemic index scale with a love for diversity and the acceptance of the freak (in these days in the dining room there is Wonder and it is impossible to prefer this film to that is a very interesting directed by Stephen Chbosky) and, in general, very few visual ideas that are worth defining these (nice and the duel dance between Jackman and Efron in the bar, apart from that what else remains?) The Greatest Showman collapses on itself with the same ease with which you dismantle a tent for the circus.

P. T. Barnum is a young boy of humble origins who dreams big (so big that he manages to imagine himself in the shoes of Hugh Jackman when he was twelve years old and looks totally different) and is always ready to pursue the first dream that comes within range. His first dream is the Charity, the daughter of the rich and obnoxious employer of his father, that the our is able to snatch with the comforts and luxuries of his life to bring her to live with you in the hope of a happier life. The happiness is there but it lacks the money to buy food for themselves, then the new dream of Barnum becomes to put together the largest show in the world, bringing together the people with the most disturbing and weird of America (Napoleon is suffering from dwarfism, the bearded lady, a Chewbacca, a Zac Efron and Zendanya, the more I think about it, the more I ask myself how and why we should consider it a freak like the Giant Irish man or 750 pounds).

And so was born the circus. Born the show-business. You can dance. Sing. And then back to the house. In the midst of more or less nothing, except a antipaticissimo the protagonist, played by an actor supersimpatico to which all of us want a lot of good (and, in fact, Barnum is a little vile and a bit mean-spirited, but just a little bit, never completely, and this gives even more hassle) and the pair Z-Z (Zendanya and Zac Efron) that works, and always seems well-stocked, but that came towards the last act will put a strain on your supplies of insulin.

The Greatest Showman Michael Gracey | Review of MangaForever.net

Advertisement

Advertisement

image

Hey friend

Your blog talks about The Greatest Showman Michael Gracey | Review? Contact Us to be indexed in the BitFeed Network