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Narcos: Mexico | Review

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Published on Nov 19, 2018

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There was a cautious expectation surrounding the arrival of Narcos: Mexico, the same who had anticipated the release of the third season of the series on Netflix: at the time we wondered if the showrunner had been able to find a way to make it even more interesting in the series after it is deprived of its most iconic (the Pablo Escobar of Wagner Moura), and after having been largely satisfied with the previous ten episodes, this time the doubts were related to the geographical location, that would take us to leave Colombia for Mexico.

The risk was to end up in the hands of a series spin-off identical to the original one that had, as the only difference, a flag with the colours similar to those of Italian background rather than the blue-yellow-red-cross banners colombian, and instead of Carlo Bernard and Doug Miro have done it well, it becomes clear right from the start: you can breathe in fresh air, in spite of the feeling is the same, the impression stage is the one that fans have come to know and love and newcomers, that is, those who are not familiar with the previous incarnation of the series, will not have any difficulty to enter in the particular world of the Narcos, who welcomes the newbies in the same way as they would with old friends.

The protagonists and opponents are presented immediately, pawns on a chessboard ready to explode, with the business of drugs in Mexico are divided between the many small entrepreneurs that are competing (that is to say a ruthless war): Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo (Diego Luna) is the one who first is able to see both long and clear, which has a goal to be achieved (to unify all of the small family business into one great international chain of supermarkets), Enrique Kiki Camalera (Michael Peña) the agent of the GODDESS that is in charge of investigating him.

When it is at its best – that is to say, almost always in the course of the ten episodes that make up this first season — Narcos: Mexico seems to want to retrace the footsteps of the seminal HBO series The Wire, in the manner in which it must investigate in the everyday life of the criminals and the forces of law and order, taking the best and the worst from both of the barricades. In particular, Felix and Kiki can't but make one think of Stringer Bell and Jimmy McNulty (respectively Idris Elba and Dominic West), with the first, which regards life as an eternal race towards the perfection of capitalism, and the second with the badge to your belt 24/7, to the point that his pursuit of justice will become a real obsession.

In the way in which the two protagonists are placed in opposition there is a lot of American Gangster, the always too underrated half-a masterpiece by Ridley Scott, in which Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe were elected to the emblems of the dichotomy of the American Dream. Here Bernard and Miro are doing the same thing, asking the Moon and Peña dramatic performances the most important of their career. And the two actors suit everyone, playing the same character, but colouring it with different shades: both of you encounter in the gears that have rusted to a bureaucratic machine that seems to want to move against them, and there is a sort of irony to bind double-wire their stories, made of greed, power, ego and respect. And it is a pleasure to learn more about them.

Narcos: Mexico | Review of MangaForever.net

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