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Dark Crimes of Alexandros Avranas | Review

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Published on Sep 06, 2018

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There is a bit of Videodrome in Dark Crimes of Alexandros Avranas, in which the tortures on women, the outrages and the macabre are almost always projected through the television screen (or narrated through audio cassettes), almost to care to detach, showing a film within the film and painting a reality that is even more brutal and colder than that in which it moves, the investigator Tadek (played by a bearded Jim Carrey, who here embraces it as the not never on the side of a nihilist so beautifully described in the documentary Jim & Andy).

Unfortunately, however, with the masterpiece of body-horror of David Cronenberg's new film of the Greek director he shares only with a visual idea in the surface that never becomes really the central point of the story, but it always remains as a sort of safety valve through which to show the scenes and more morbid, dirty and violent, to tell you the truth, unless this is not the first film of your life, they can never affect you really.

Over on the affiliation of the production of a film about slavery, sex Brett Ratner of Ratpac Entertainment (one of the first to have been accused of violence in the wake of the case, Weinstein: this is karma!) Dark Crimes represents a considerable step back for Avranas, which so well had done in 2013, Miss Violence, which dealt with arguments very similar to those of his new project but he did it with a lot more rawness, simplicity and decision. In the stage the true story of a policeman Polish in the novel of a writer found the solution to a murder, Avranas it turns out very uncomfortable in dealing with the kind of reference and what comes out is a sort of Inspector Callaghan: The Scorpio it's Yours! Don Siegel, but absolutely no stain.

Like in the movie with Clint Eastwood, in fact, also here the protagonist will be forced to release the criminal for lack of evidence (there was Andrew Robinson, here will be Marton Csokas), giving the opportunity to slander the police department (as a Scorpio, even Kozlov claimed to have suffered ill-treatment by the police in the past period in custody). The problem is that the detective Tadek can not be and in fact, is never the inspector Callaghan, and although he is willing to operate beyond the boundaries of the law even to trap her suspect, will never be able to boast, the iconic, and/or the effectiveness of the aggressive methods of the famous hero action the ’70s.

So you go ahead with this bland version of the famous game of cat-and-mouse for the whole movie, intrecciandolo to personal matters of little interest (Tadek is one of the many cops in the history of cinema with marital problems) and a sub-plot (that of the girlfriend of Kozlow) that would like to be hazy and exciting, but that is very superficial. Maybe would have worked more if it had been the center of the film, and would certainly have made it less thankless role of Charlotte Gainsbourg (probably the most ungrateful of his long and busy career). Carrey is, as always, a wonderful job, but exactly as it did in the Number 23, Joel Schumacher, his talent is put to the service of a movie confused from the beginning to the end; not only at the narrative level, but especially at the level of identity.

Dark Crimes of Alexandros Avranas | Review of MangaForever.net

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