The announcement of the beginning of the transition to Apple’s Silicon has attracted the attention of many, including former Microsoft executive Steven Sinofsky, who stated that he was baffled by this move.

The next evening the keynote of the WWDC 2020 Apple, the former president of the Windows Divison at Microsoft, Steven Sinofsky, has spoken on Twitter of the importance of the annual Worldwide Developers Conference and Apple as a whole.

Amidst all the details, installing the pre-release, and commentary (including my own) I want to take a moment to reflect on #WWDC ” putting it in context of the past two decades. Quite simply, what we’re seeing is some of the most remarkable of product engineering with over time in history. 1/ pic.twitter.com/hTrQ1R7Pgv

— Steven Sinofsky (@stevesi) June 23, 2020

Sinofsky spoke about the company from Cupertino, in general, by saying that according to him has created a team that has “done more and performed better” than any other company can appoint. This is great praise, considering that Sinofsky joined Microsoft in 1989 and has continued to work with the company until 2012.

Continuing with the analysis, defines the company’s “fearless” for revealing to his audience that the full switchover to Apple’s Silicon would have required two years. In addition, he praised Tim Cook calling it courageous in proclaiming something that maybe could change in the span of two years, or even that could go wrong.

It also emphasises the fact that Apple has taken the time to think of what the customers need, without chasing the trends of the moment. In this way, Apple is able to offer a long lasting product that integrates perfectly in the life of a user, rather than something that fits simply to a trend of short duration.

Apple produces products that customers love and are happy, but they create them by studying the technology, market, and use to arrive at plans and strategies. Unlike what you read in the textbooks, Apple is much less concerned to respond to micro-changes, cycles of hype, or even the “feedback” because it is a company that has its own point of view: when the point of view aligns with a great product that people love, can become an unstoppable force.

For example, it mentions the transition to 64-bit at the level of the consumer. Microsoft has started the transition in 2003, but continues to support 32-bit still today. Apple, however, has started to require developers to create apps to 64 bit in 2017 and has abandoned support for the app to 32-bit in 2019 with the release of macOS Catalina. Sinofsky calls this strategy “without fear” and considers it as the reason that Apple will be able to go to the Apple Silicon without problems, though for many it may be a bold move.

What is most striking, however, is the ability of Apple to constantly upgrade its products and software. This fierce dedication in having long-term goals has allowed the company to succeed where many have failed.

Sinofsky makes it clear that this strategy does not work and will not work for every company. It is a corporate culture cultivated by several decades, which has required dedication, teamwork, and endless research. He then concludes by saying in the manner of the lapidary:

There is only one Apple. Do not try to copy it.